Georgia's guide to early care & learning (2024)

early care learning GEORGIA'S GUIDETO
&
Presented by Georgia Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (GACCRRA) and Bright from the Start: Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning
Supporting Your Child's Development
Embracing Diversity
Kids, Sports and EXERCISE

What is the Georgia Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (GACCRRA)?

The Georgia Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (GACCRRA) is a non-profit, 501(c)(3), membership organization composed of 14 regional Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (CCR&Rs) serving the entire state of Georgia. GACCRRA's mission is to support the work of CCR&Rs to improve child care in Georgia. Because of the long-standing relationships CCR&Rs have established in their communities, they are in a unique position to support the development of quality child care in Georgia. CCR&Rs play a catalyst role as change agents in their communities, improving the child care and family support systems.
GACCRRA provides vision, leadership, and support to community CCR&Rs and promotes state policies and partnerships committed to high-quality child care. GACCRRA shares the vision of our National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (NACCRRA): a nation which supports the development and learning of all children. In August 2006, GACCRRA opened its network office and hired staff to focus on the enrichment of service delivery.

CHILD CARE RESOURCE & REFERRAL AGENCIES SERVICE DELIVERY REGIONS

Northwest Georgia at Cartersville Northeast Georgia at Gainesville Metro Atlanta West Central Georgia at Thomaston Northeast Georgia at Athens Central Georgia at Macon East Georgia at Augusta

(770) 387-0828 or (800) 308-1825 (770) 718-3883 or (800) 793-6383 (404) 479-4200 or (877) 722-2445 (706) 646-6215 or (800) 613-8546 (706) 613-1603 or (877) 877-1275 (478) 752-7800 or (800) 558-4804 (706) 729-2353 or (877) 228-3566

West Georgia at Columbus West Georgia at Americus East Central Georgia at Swainsboro Southwest Georgia at Albany South Central Georgia at Tifton South Central Georgia at Waycross Southeast Georgia at Savannah

(706) 569-3109 or (800) 650-2102 (229) 931-2997 or (800) 465-0414 (478) 289-2275 or (877) 495-9188 (229) 317-6834 or (866) 833-3552 (229) 382-9919 or (888) 893-4582 (912) 285-6288 or (877) 244-5379 (912) 443-3011 or (877) 935-7575

What do Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) agencies do?

CCR&Rs help parents find child care...
Choosing child care is one of the most important decisions families make, but all too often they must rely on word-of-mouth. Local Child Care Resource and Referral (CCR&R) agencies help parents take the guesswork out of choosing care giving them referrals to local child care providers, information on state licensing requirements, availability of child care subsidies, and other pertinent information. CCR&Rs provide guidance tailored to each individual family by phone, in person or through the internet.
CCR&Rs support families to raise healthy children...
By talking with parents one-on-one, CCR&R counselors gain a unique understanding of the delicate balance of family life, particularly for low-income families. They understand that finding high-quality child care is just a first step to raising happy, healthy children. Through workshops, hot lines, and newsletters, CCR&Rs reach out to parents with trusted, local information that enables them to make informed choices.
CCR&Rs build the supply of child care...
In most communities, demand for child care far outstrips supply. CCR&Rs provide an entry point to the child care field, helping providers meet licensing requirements. CCR&Rs also support providers by offering low-cost or free trainings in diverse topics like health and safety, child development, and sound business practices. CCR&Rs work with local and state governments and the private sector to leverage resources for building and maintaining the supply of quality child care.
CCR&Rs improve the quality of child care...
No one has a greater impact on the quality of child care than the people who work with children every day. That is why CCR&Rs across the country provide ongoing professional development opportunities to child care providers and staff. By supporting accreditation programs, helping create financial incentives for education, and advocating for better compensation for providers, CCR&Rs improve the quality of care for all children.

CCR&Rs bridge child care and education...
High-quality child care has many benefits, including preparing children for school. CCR&Rs strive to create child care settings that help children grow and learn. Educating parents about early learning and the components of quality care is also a major part of CCR&R services. CCR&Rs are dedicated to informing communities about the important links between early learning and later success in school. CCR&Rs provide on-site technical assistance to enhance quality care.
CCR&Rs document child care needs and trends...
What makes CCR&Rs unique is their ability to gather information to better understand family needs. CCR&Rs are the major source of information about the local supply and cost of child care. CCR&Rs are able to track trends about the changing needs of families.
CCR&Rs engage new partners...
High-quality child care does more than benefit children; it can create positive results for entire families and for communities as a whole. By reaching out to business leaders, law enforcement, school teachers, and others, CCR&Rs help make child care an important issue for the entire community. CCR&Rs collaborate with other family support services to promote a holistic vision of child care that includes health, literacy, and special needs.
CCR&Rs tell the child care story...
By providing resources, documenting community needs, and creating new ways to meet those needs, CCR&Rs bring the voices of children, families, and child care providers to the public.

(800) 466-5681 www.gaccrra.org

Sonny Perdue Governor

10 Park Place, Suite 200 Atlanta, Georgia 30303
(404) 656-5957

Marsha H. Moore Commissioner

Dear Parents,
Bright from the Start: Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning is honored to partner with you the parents and caregivers of Georgia's children to help prepare them to succeed...in school and in life. Bright from the Start was established in 2004 to develop a coordinated, streamlined system to meet the early care and education needs of our state's children and their families. In order to do this most effectively, we need your help.
Following are just some of the reasons that you as parents and caregivers of Georgia's children are an important part of the system that Bright from the Start is creating.
Research clearly supports that the years between birth and age five are the most critical in a child's life in terms of brain development.
The people who spend the most time with children during these formative years their parents and child care providers greatly affect a child's development.
Everyday experiences in a child's life are learning opportunities and can be taken advantage of and enhanced by parents and caregivers.
A child's physical, nutritional, emotional, and social development, most of which occurs at home or in child care, are as important as his or her academic development.
Bright from the Start provides a variety of programs and other resources to support you in your critical role as your child's first teacher. Our ad on the following page introduces you to some of the statewide programs that Bright from the Start administers. To learn more about our programs, visit our website at www.decal.state.ga.us.
We also fund and work closely with child care resource and referral agencies (CCR&R) around the state. Fourteen CCR&Rs exist in local communities to help parents and caregivers with child care needs. The name, location, service area, and contact information for your local CCR&R is included in this guide. If you need help locating appropriate child care or have questions, challenges, or issues relating to child care, contact your local CCR&R agency.
Bright from the Start is pleased to sponsor this statewide early care and education guide, which is full of relevant and informative articles, activities, and tips to help you as you interact with your children. I encourage you to take time to read the guide carefully and to contact your local CCR&R or the Bright from the Start office if you have questions or need more information about a particular topic or activity.
Bright from the Start recognizes your awesome responsibility as the parents and caregivers of Georgia's children. We also take our mission to develop and implement a high quality system of early care and learning seriously. By working together and supporting each other, we can ensure that every child in Georgia receives a solid foundation upon which he or she can build a lifetime of learning.
The future of our children and of our state depends on how well we do our jobs.
Sincerely,
Marsha H. Moore Commissioner

Pg 12: Making the most of time with your family
Pg 20: The importance of play in your child's healthy development
Pg 23: Working together to keep our children safe 4

CONTENTS
6-7, 10 Resources 8-9 Child Care Resource & Referral Agency Information 11 Helping Promote Healthy Brain Development 12 Family Time: Accept no Substitute 13 5 Principles of Powerful Parenting 14 The Brain: An Organ of Major Importance 15 Discipline & Young Children 16 Raising a Reader, Raising a Writer 18 Is my child ready for Kindergarten? 19 Ten Ways to Nurture Tolerance 20 Play is FUNdamental 21 Kids, Sports, and Exercise 22 Working without Weaning: A Mother's Guide to Breastfeeding 23 Prevent Child Abuse Georgia 24 Choosing Quality Child Care 24 Child Care Checklist 25 Inclusion/Mainstreaming 26 Will you take the Credit this year? You earned it! 27 Creating a Child Care and Home Connection
Espaol
28 Escogiendo una guardera infantil 30 List de chequeo de cuidado infantil

GEORGIA'S GUIDE TO
early care & learning
PUBLISHER Dina Kessler 888-708-5700, ext 13 dkessler@jkhpubs.com
SENIOR GRAPHIC ARTIST Dee Emery 888-708-5700, ext 30 demery@jkhpubs.com
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RESEARCH ASSISTANT Patricia Payne
PRESIDENT, CUSTOM PUBLISHING DIVISION Keith J. E. Kessler 888-708-5700, ext 12 kkessler@jkhpubs.com
JK Harris Publications, LLC has worked to make this Guide to Early Care & Learning the most complete guide available; however, we assume no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions, nor do we recommend programs or individuals. JK Harris Publications, LLC does not warrant the accuracy or reliability of any of the information contained in the Guide. Some information may have changed since collected, or new facilities may have opened while others may have moved or closed. Please verify all information when contacting a provider. While we are excited to be able to provide this service to the community, we do encourage families to use this publication for informational purposes only. Professionals should be consulted on any issues concerning the health, safety and welfare of your family.
For all advertising related questions, please contact our Sales Department at
888-708-5700 ext 12
or visit our website at www.earlycareguide.com.
2007 JK Harris Publications, LLC. All rights reserved. Nothing herein contained may be reproduced in any manner without written permission of JK Harris Publications, LLC, 12276 San Jose Blvd., Suite 212, Jacksonville, FL 32223 (904) 346-3898. Toll free (888) 708-5700.

For more health care information, please call the Powerline at 800-822-2539.

The Division of Public Health Helps to Assure Georgia a

DIVISION OF PUBLIC HEALTH http://health.state.ga.us

Through:

Newborn Screenings
Newborn Screening for Metabolic and Sickle Cell Disorders Program provides early detection of genetic disorders as defined by Georgia law; referral for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up upon request. Ages: Newborns. Eligibility Requirements: Available for all newborns. Web: http://health.state.ga.us/programs/nsmscd/ Contact: 404-657-4143

Safer Behaviors
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Other Infant Death (OID) Program provides education on SIDS/OID and risk reduction to parents, health professionals and child care providers. Bereavement support for families who experience loss. Eligibility Requirements: None. Web: http://health.state.ga.us/programs/sids/ Contact: 404-463-2117 or 800-822-2539

Referrals

Early Intervention

Children 1st Program provides a system of early identification for children at risk. Single point of entry for programs including Babies Can't Wait, Children's Medical Services, High Risk Infant Follow-Up & Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and Intervention. Provides referral information for public health and community programs and services via home visit. Ages: Birth 5 years. Eligibility Requirements: None. Web: http://health.state.ga.us/programs/childrenfirst/ Contact: 404-657-4143 or 800-822-2539

Babies Can't Wait Program provides supports and services for families of infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities and/or significant delays. Ages: Birth 3 years. Eligibility Requirements: Significant physical, mental, language or social delay or an eligible diagnosed condition. Web: http://health.state.ga.us/programs/bcw/ Contact: 800-229-2038 or 888-651-8224

Newborn Hearing Screening
Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and Intervention Program provides initial and secondary screenings and referrals for children with identified hearing impairment, diagnosis and entry into intervention program. Ages: Newborns. Eligibility Requirements: Available for all newborns. Web: http://health.state.ga.us/programs/unhs/ Contact: 404-463-2192 or 800-822-2539

Medical Services
Children's Medical Services Program may arrange for services related to covered chronic medical conditions through care coordination or may pay for related services if funds are available. Ages: Birth 21 years. Eligibility Requirements: Eligibility based on Federal Poverty Level. Medicaid enrollees, SSI recipients and those in foster care are also eligible. Web: http://health.state.ga.us/programs/cms/ Contact: 800-229-2038 or 888-651-8224

Nutritional Supplements and Education
Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Program provides nutrition education, breastfeeding support and vouchers for healthy food supplements. Ages: Breastfeeding, Pregnant or Post-Partum NonBreastfeeding Women and Children Birth 5 years. Eligibility Requirements: Children Birth 5 years, Breastfeeding, Pregnant or Post-Partum Non-Breastfeeding Women. Web: http://health.state.ga.us/programs/wic/ Contact: 800-228-9173
Dental Services
Georgia Oral Health Prevention Program provides preventive dental health services. Ages: Pre-school and school age children. Eligibility Requirements: People without access to preventive dental health services. Web: http://health.state.ga.us/programs/oral/ Contact: 404-657-6639
Immunizations
Vaccines for Children, Georgia Immunization Program provides vaccines to enrolled providers for administration to children who are enrolled in Medicaid, uninsured, underinsured or are Alaska natives or Native American children. Ages: Birth 18 years. Eligibility Requirements: Children birth 18 years who are enrolled in Medicaid, uninsured, underinsured or are Alaska natives or Native American. Web: http://health.state.ga.us/programs/immunization/vfc/ Contact: 404-657-5013, 404-657-5015 or 800-848-3868

For more information, contact your local health department, visit http://health.state.ga.us/regional/, call Powerline 800-822-2539 or email familyhealth@dhr.state.ga.us.

RESOURCES
Emergency
Fire, Police, & Medical Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .911 Georgia's Poison Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-222-1222
Community, Counseling, Family Health, Family Services
Alcoholics Anonymous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-525-3178 Alternate Life Paths Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-688-1002 Americans with Disabilities Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-514-0301 American Red Cross
Atlanta Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-876-3302 Central Georgia Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-743-8671 East Georgia Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-353-1645 Northeast Georgia Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-532-8453 Southwest Georgia Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-436-4845 West Central Georgia Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-323-5614 Child Care Resources (Nanny/Au Pair Referral & Placement Agency) .770-619-0377 Children's Environmental Health Network (CEHN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202-543-4033 Emory Health System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-778-7777 Georgia Afterschool Investment Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-527-7250 Georgia Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies (GACCRRA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-466-5681 Child Care Resource & Referral Agency (CCRR) of:
Central Georgia at Macon (at Quality Care for Children) . . . . . . . . . . . .478-752-7800 or 800-558-4804
East Central Georgia of Swainsboro (at Swainsboro Technical College) . . . . . . . .478-289-2275 or 877-495-9188 Dublin Satellite Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-300-2316
East Georgia at Augusta (at Medical College of Georgia) . . . . . . . . . . .706-729-2353 or 877-228-3566
Metro Atlanta (at Quality Care or Children) . . .404-479-4200 or 877-722-2445 Northeast Georgia at Athens
(at Community Connection) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-613-1603 or 800-924-5085 Northeast Georgia at Gainesville
(at Gainesville State College) . . . . . . . . . . . .770-718-3883 or 800-793-6383 Northwest Georgia at Cartersville
(Quality Care for Children) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-387-0828 or 800-308-1825 Dalton Satellite Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-370-5074 ext 240
Southeast Georgia at Savannah (Early Start at Savannah Technical College) . . . . . . . . . . . .912-443-3011 or 877-935-7575 Brunswick Satellite Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-262-9248 or 800-834-9803
South Central Georgia at Tifton (at Kids' Advocacy Coalition) . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-382-9919 or 888-893-4582
South Central Georgia at Waycross (at Concerted Services, Inc.) . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-338-9000 or 877-244-5379
Southwest GA at Albany (Stepping Stones at Darton College) . . . . . . .229-317-6868 or 866-833-3552
West Central Georgia at Thomaston (at Flint River Technical College) . . . . . . . . . .706-646-6215 or 800-613-8546
West Georgia at Americus (at South Georgia Technical College) . . . . . .229-928-3499 or 800-465-0414
West Georgia at Columbus (at Columbus State University) . . . . . . . . . . .706-569-3109 or 800-650-2102
Safe Kids Columbus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-321-6183 Georgia Cancer Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .888-441-2873
Northwest Georgia Regional Cancer Coalition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-295-6048 Southwest Georgia Cancer Coalition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-312-1700 Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-209-0280 Project Safe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-334-2836 Georgia Council on Child Abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-532-3208 Georgia Department of Community Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-656-4507 Peach Care for Kids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .877-427-3224 Georgia Department of Human Resources Division of Family and Children Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-5258 Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities
and Addictive Diseases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2168 Division of Public Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2700
Adolescent Health & Youth Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-656-6679 Adoption & Foster Parenting DFCS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .877-210-5437 Babies Can't Wait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2762 or 888-651-8224 Cancer Control Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6648 Cardiovascular Health Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6626 Chemical Hazards Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6534 Child Support Enforcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-227-7993 Childcare and Parent Services (CAPS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-463-8036

Children 1st . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-4143 Children with Special Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2762 or 888-651-8224 Children's Medical Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2762 or 888-651-8224 Chronic Disease Epidemiology Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-3103 Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Branch . . . . .404-657-2550 Community Health Promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2570 Emergency Medical Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-679-0547 Emergency Preparedness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2594 Environmental Health and Injury Prevention Branch . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6534 Environmental Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6534 Epidemiology Branch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2588 Family Health Branch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2850 Family Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-3143 Georgia Tobacco Quit Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .877-270-7867 Health Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-463-0183 Health Services Assessment Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6438 Health Status and Risk Factors Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6440 Hearing and Vision Conservation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6359 High Risk Infant Follow-Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2762 Immunization Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-3158 Infant and Child Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-4143 Injury Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-679-0500 Laboratory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-327-7900 Legal Services and Policy Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2700 Maternal & Child Health Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6448 Maternal and Infant Health Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2866 Men's Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-3143 Newborn Screening for Metabolic and Sickle Cell Disorders . . . .404-657-4143 Notifiable Disease Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2588 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2884 Perinatal Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-3143 Prevention Services Branch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2700 Right from the Start Medicaid Under DFCS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-809-7276 School Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-463-0183 SIDS/Other Infant Death Information & Counseling . . . . . . . . . . .404-463-2117 State Pharmacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2557 STD/HIV Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-3100 Tobacco Use Prevention Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6649 Tuberculosis (TB) Epidemiology Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2634 Tuberculosis Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2634 Universal Newborn Hearing Screening & Intervention . . . . . . . . .404-657-4143 Violence Against Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-3143 Vital Records Branch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-679-4701 Women Infants and Children (WIC) Branch . . .404-657-2900 or 800-228-9173 Women's Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-3143 Office of Adoptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .888-460-2467 Office of Child Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-227-7993 Office of Health Information and Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6320 Office of Infant & Child Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-4143 Office of Nursing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-6016 Office of Regulatory Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-5700 Oral Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2571 Georgia Department of Labor Career Center Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-232-3540 Employment Programs/Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-232-3515 Rehabilitation Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-232-3910 Georgia Department of Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-656-5267 Georgia Health Partnership Provider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-766-4456 Georgia Healthy Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .888-423-6765 Georgia Legal Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-206-5175 Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-297-6146 Georgia Network to End Sexual Assault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .866-354-3672 Georgia Parent Support Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-832-8645 Georgia Partnership for Caring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-982-4723 Georgia School Age Care Association (GSACA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-373-7414 Goodwill Industries of North Georgia, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-728-8601 Governor's Office of Consumer Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-656-3790 Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-451-0020 Powerline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-822-2539 Hunger Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-622-8299 Immigration Counseling Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-375-5283 Latin American Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-638-1800 March of Dimes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-367-6630 Office of Secretary of State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-656-2881 Planned Parenthood of Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-688-9305 Prevent Child Abuse Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-244-5373 Project SAFE, Incorporated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-543-3331 Refugee Family Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-299-2243 Safe Kids of Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-785-7200 Save the Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-728-3843 SIDS Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-221-7437

6

For more health care information, please call the Powerline at 800-822-2539.

Social Security Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-331-4155 Statewide Immunization Registry (GRITS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .888-223-8644 Stop it Now! Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-870-6565 Supreme Court of Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-656-3470 The Partnership Against Domestic Violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-870-9600 The Salvation Army . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-441-6200 United Way of Central Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-745-4732 United Way of Coastal Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-265-1850 United Way of Hall County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-536-1121 United Way of Metro Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-614-1000 United Way of Northeast Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-543-5254 United Way of Northwest Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-226-4357 United Way of South Central Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-572-0342 United Way of Southeast Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-489-8475 United Way of Southwest Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-883-6700 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development . . . . . . . . . . . .404-331-5001 Voices for Georgia's Children GA-CAN! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-521-0311
Education
Bright from the Start: Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning 404-656-5957 Child Care Inquiry/Complaint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-463-0703 or . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-463-0704
Georgia Department of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-311-3627 Division for Exceptional Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-656-3963 Office of Curriculum and Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-656-2804 Office of Finance and Business Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-656-2492 Office of Instructional Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-0810 Office of Policy and External Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-0515 Office of Teacher and Student Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2965
Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education . . . . . . . . . . .404-679-1600 Georgia Head Start Association, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-861-0105 Georgia GED Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-946-9433 Scholarships and INCENTIVES Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-939-9694 Smart Start Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .877-782-7842 TEACH Scholarship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-475-1453 or 800-532-9865
Hospitals
Northwest Georgia Cartersville Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-382-1530 Fannin Regional Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-632-3711 Floyd Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-509-5000 Gordon Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-629-2895
Northeast Georgia Athens Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-475-7000 Barrow Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-867-3400 Elbert Memorial Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-283-3151 Stephens County Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-282-4200
West Central Georgia Sylvan Grove Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-775-7861 Tanner Medical Center/Carrollton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-836-9666 Upson Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-647-8111 West Georgia Health System West Georgia Medical Center . . . . . . .706-882-1411
Central Georgia Coliseum Medical Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-765-7000 Oconee Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-454-3505 Perry Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-987-3600 Putnam General Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-485-2711
East Georgia Augusta VA Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-733-0188 Burke Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-554-4435 Jefferson Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-625-7000 Jenkins County Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-982-4221
West Georgia Columbus Regional Healthcare System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-571-1000 Crisp Regional Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-276-3100 Doctors Hospital of Columbus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-494-4262 Southwest Georgia Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-732-2181
East Central Georgia Appling Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-367-9841 Dodge County Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-448-4000 Fairview Park Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-275-2000 Wayne Memorial Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-427-6811
Southwest Georgia Colquitt Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-985-3420 Early Memorial Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-723-4241

Grady General Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-377-1150 Miller County Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-758-3385
South Central Georgia Bacon County Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-632-8961 Brooks County Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-263-4171 East Georgia Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-486-1000 Tift Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-382-7120
Southeast Georgia Candler Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-819-6000 Effingham Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-754-6451 Liberty Regional Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-369-9400 Southeast Georgia Health System Brunswick Campus . . . . . . . . .912-466-7000
Libraries
Athens Regional Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-613-3650 Bartow County Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-382-4203 Bartram Trail Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-678-7736 Brooks County Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-263-4412 Columbus Library for Accessible Services (CLASS) . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-857-2553 Chestatee Regional Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-344-3690 Coastal Plain Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-386-3400 DeSoto Trail Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-336-8372 Dougherty County Public Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-420-3200 East Central Georgia Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-821-2600 Elbert County Public Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-283-5375 Flint River Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-412-4770 Hall County Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-532-3311 Hart County Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-376-4655 Henry County Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-954-2806 Houston County Public Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-987-3050 Jefferson County Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-625-3751 Kinchafoonee Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-995-6331 Lake Blackshear Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-924-8091 Lee County Public Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-759-2369 Live Oak Public Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-652-3600 Middle Georgia Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-744-0800 Middle Georgia Subregional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-985-6540 Mountain Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-379-3732 Newton County Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-787-3231 Northeast Georgia Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-754-4413 Northwest Georgia Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-876-1360 Ocmulgee Regional Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-374-4711 Oconee Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-272-5710 Ohoopee Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-537-9283 Okefenokee Regional Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-287-4978 Peach Public Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-825-1640 Piedmont Regional Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-867-2762 Pine Mountain Regional Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-846-2186 Roddenbery Memorial Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-377-3632 Sara Hightower Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-236-4611 Satilla Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-384-4667 Screven-Jenkins Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-564-7526 Sequoyah Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-479-3090 South Georgia Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-333-0086 Southwest Georgia Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-248-2665 Statesboro Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-764-1341 Thomas County Public Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-225-5252 Three Rivers Regional Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-267-1212 Troup-Harris-Coweta Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-882-7784 Twin Lakes Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-452-0677 Uncle Remus Regional Library System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-342-4974 West Georgia Regional Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-836-6711
Special Needs
Babies Can't Wait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2762 or 800-229-2038 Child Care Law Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .415-394-7144 Child Care Resource & Referral Inclusion Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-656-5957 Department of Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-514-0301 Easter Seals of East Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-667-9695 or 866-667-9695 Easter Seals of Middle Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-275-8850 Easter Seals of North Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-943-1070 Easter Seals of Southern Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-439-7061 or 800-365-4583 Easter Seals of West Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706 660-1144 Family Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-256-2988 Foundation for Medically Fragile Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-951-6111 Friends of Disabled Adults & Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-491-9014 Georgia Learning Resources System (GLRS)
(Continued on page 10)

For more child care information, please call GACCRRA at 800-466-5681.

7

Quality Care for Children
CHILD CARE RESOURCE & REFERRAL AGENCY OF CENTRAL GEORGIA
Quality Care for Children works with parents, child care providers and communities to nurture and educate infants and young children.
Counties served in Central Georgia: Baldwin, Bibb, Crawford, Houston, Jones, Monroe, Peach, Pulaski, Putnam, Twiggs and Wilkinson.
Services for Parents
We provide free referrals for parents seeking child care, before and after school programs and summer camps through a Parent Referral Line and 24-hour online child care search.
We educate parents on how to choose appropriate child care for their children.
We facilitate finding child care for children with special needs. We operate a Resource Room & Lending Library. Parents can call 478-752-7800
Services for Child Care Providers
Works with child care providers to improve the quality of child care in Central Georgia.
Offers telephone and on-site consultation. Provides technical assistance in caring for children with special needs. Makes classroom training, on-site training and written materials available
in English and Spanish. Offers technical assistance to churches, synagogues and other nonprofit
agencies to start or improve quality child care in all 159 counties in Georgia. Operates a Resource Room & Lending Library. Serves as the largest Child Care Food Program in the Southeast serving
more than 1,100 family child care providers. Child Care Providers can call 478-752-7800
Quality Care for Children in Central Georgia
277 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Suite 104 Macon GA 31201 Fax: 478-752-7796
800-558-4804 or 478-752-7800 info@qualitycareforchildren.org www.qualitycareforchildren.org

Quality Care for Children
UN AGENCIA DE RECURSOS Y REFERENCIA CUIDADO INFANTIL DE CENTRAL GEORGIA
Quality Care for Children los trabajo con padres, proveedores de guardera y comunidades para nutrir y educar nios y a nios jvenes.
Central Georgia sirve un rea de 11 condados que son Baldwin, Bibb, Crawford, Houston, Jones, Monroe, Peach, Pulaski, Putnam, Twiggs y Wilkinson.
Servicios para padres
Nosotros proporcionamos informacin gratuita a padres que buscan cuidado de nios antes y despus de la escuela y para campamentos de verano, a travs de la lnea de referencias para padres y las 24 horas por internet.
Nosotros educamos a padres sobre cmo escoger un lugar apropiado para el cuidado de sus nios. Nosotros le ayudamos a encontrar cuidado para nios con
necesidades especiales. Operamos un Cuarto de Recursos y Biblioteca con Prstamo. Los padres pueden llamar al 478-752-7800
Servicios para Proveedoras de Cuidado Infantil
Se trabaja con los proveedores del cuidado infantil para mejorar la calidad del cuidado infantil en Central Georgia. Se ofrecen consultas por telfono y la consulta local. Se proporciona asistencia tcnica en el cuidado de nios con necesidades especiales. Se ofrece entrenamientos, asistencia tcnica y materiales escritos disponibles en espaol y ingls. Se ofrece asistencia tcnica a las iglesias, sinagogas y otras agencias sin fines de lucro para empezar y mejorarla calidad del cuidado infantil en todos los 159 condados de Georgia. Opera un Cuarto de Recursos y Biblioteca con Prstamo. Sirve como El Programa de Comida para Nios que Reciben Cuidados ms de 1,100 proveedores de cuidado infantil en el hogar. Proveedores de Cuidado Infantil puede llamar al 478-752-7800
Quality Care for Children in Central Georgia
277 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard Suite 104 Macon GA 31201 Fax: 478-752-7796
800-558-4804 or 478-752-7800 info@qualitycareforchildren.org www.qualitycareforchildren.org

Coastal GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-827-5239 East Georgia GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-282-7552 East Central GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-275-3666 Metro East GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .678-676-2400 Metro South GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-412-4082 Metro West GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-432-2404 Middle Georgia GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .478-475-8630 North Georgia GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-865-2043 North Central GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-276-1111 Northeast GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-742-8292 Northwest GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-295-6189 South Georgia GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-546-4367 South Central GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-338-5998 Southeast GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-739-1551 Southwest GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .229-432-9151 West Georgia GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .706-748-2140 West Central GLRS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-583-2528 Georgia P.I.N.E.S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-298-4882 or 800-522-8652 Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-657-2126 or 888-275-4233 Mental Health American of Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-527-7175 Parent to Parent of Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-451-5484 or 800-229-2038 Powerline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-822-2539 Southeast Disability & Business Technical Assistance Center . . . . . .800-949-4232 The ARC of Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .404-634-5512 Tools for Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-497-8665 United Cerebral Palsy of Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . .770-676-2000 or 888-827-9455
State/National Information & Referral
Adult & Child Abuse Reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-752-6200 AL-Anon/Alateen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .888-425-2666 American Academy of Family Physicians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-274-2237

Childfind of America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-426-5678 Childhelp USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-422-4453 Children's Defense Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-233-1200 Crib Death (SIDS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-221-7437 Crime Victims/Witness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-242-0804 Family Development Resources, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-825-5736 Georgia AIDS Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-551-2728 Georgia Drug Abuse Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-338-6745 Girls & Boys Town National Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-448-3000 National Association for Family Child Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-359-3817 National Association for Sickle Cell Disease . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-421-8453 National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) .800-424-2460 National Association of Child Care Resource &
Referral Agencies (NACCRRA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-424-2246 National Black Child Development Institute (BCDI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-556-2234 National Center for Missing & Exploited Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-843-5678 National Child Care Information Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-616-2242 National Child Safety Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-222-1464 National Childwatch Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-222-1464 National Domestic Violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-799-7233 National Early Childhood Program Accreditation (NECPA) . . . . . . . .800-505-9878 National Organization for Victim Assistance (NOVA) . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-879-6682 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-273-8255 National Women's Health Information Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-994-9662 Nine Line (Teens in Crisis) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-999-9999 Parent's Anonymous Child Abuse Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-422-4453 Parents Without Partners, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-637-7974 Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-656-4673 Sighting/Registering Cases for Missing Children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-872-5437 Stepfamily Association of America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-735-0329 Vanished Children's Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-826-4743 Victims of Crime Helpline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .800-394-2255

HELPFUL WEBSITES

Parenting and Child Development
www.4woman.gov The National Women's Health Information Center
www.connectforkids.org Helping adults make their communities better places for families and children
www.familyeducation.com Parenting advice, covering school, family entertainment and life in general
www.fen.com Family Education Network
www.health.state.ga.us/pdfs/familyhealth/hccg/loving care.0103.pdf Georgia Department of Human Resources Loving Care: Health, Nutrition and Safety Tips
www.health.state.ga.us/publications/growthdev Georgia Department of Human Resources - Growth and Development
http://health.state.ga.us/programs/immunization Georgia Child Care and School Immunization
www.keepkidshealthy.com A pediatrician's guide to children's health and safety
www.kidshealth.com Doctor-approved health information from before birth to adolescence
www.kidsource.com Children's development & Health Issues
www.netsmartz.org Interactive online safety site for children, teens, parents and educators
www.our-kids.org Devoted to raising special kids with special needs
http://parenting.ivillage.com Raising kids and dealing with teenagers

www.welcomeaddition.com Parenting concerns from pregnancy to childhood www.pbs.org/parents PBS Parents www.zerotothree.org Promoting the healthy development of our nation's infants and toddlers
Child Care Resource & Referrals (CCR&R)
http://ccrr.swainsborotech.edu CCR&R of East Central Georgia of Swainsboro Tech http://ccrrc.colstate.edu CCR&R of West Georgia at Columbus http://communityconnection211.com CCR&R of Northeast Georgia at Athens www.concertedservices.org Concerted Services, Inc. CCR&R of South Central Georgia at Waycross www.flintrivertech.edu/ccr&r/ccrr.htm CCR&R of West Central Georgia at Thomaston www.gaccrra.org Georgia Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies www.gsc.edu/childcare CCR&R of Northeast Georgia at Gainesville www.kac-ccrr.org CCR&R of South Central Georgia at Tifton www.mcg.edu/pediatrics/ccrr CCR&R of East Georgia at Augusta www.qualitycareforchildren.org Quality Care for Children, CCR&R Agencies of: Central Georgia at Macon, Northwest Georgia and Metro Atlanta

http://steppingstones.darton.edu Stepping Stones CCR&R of Southwest Georgia at Albany www.visionsforsumterccrr.com CCR&R of West Georgia at Americus
Local and State Resources
www.decal.state.ga.us Bright from the Start: Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning www.dtae.org Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education www.gacollegesavings.com Georgia Higher Education Savings Plan www.health.state.ga.us/programs Georgia Department of Human Resources Division of Public Health Programs www.peachcare.org PeachCare for Kids www.smartstartga.org/home.php Smart Start Georgia
National Resources
www.aap.org/referral American Academy of Pediatrics Pediatrician Referral Service www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/ccb Federal Child Care Bureau dedicated to enhancing the quality, affordability and availability of child care www.dhhs.gov United States Department of Health and Human Services www.ed.gov/index.jsp United States Department of Education

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For more health care information, please call the Powerline at 800-822-2539.

Helping Promote Healthy Brain Development

AT THIS AGE: 0 1 Year
Children Are: Developing trust, love and security Developing attachment and bonding with
caring adults Developing awareness of their bodies
and surroundings Developing small and large motor skills
Adults Can: Be consistent, responsive and provide safe
routines and surroundings Cuddle and hold babies Talk and read daily to babies Vary babies' environments during the day Have toys for babies to squeeze, teethe,
suck, grasp, push and pull Provide nutritious foods; breastfeed
if possible Schedule and keep developmental
screenings as advised by your doctor Begin well-child check ups
AT THIS AGE: 1 2 Years
Children Are: Developing vocabulary Developing self-confidence Developing more independence and
testing limits Discovering through trial and error Developing hand/eye coordination Beginning to understand the concept of
parts and wholes Pointing to some body parts
Adults Can: Provide materials such as stacking and
nesting toys, lacing materials, musical instruments, finger paints and crayons Create opportunities to make choices Praise appropriate behavior and set limits consistently Avoid TV viewing Model good behaviors Encourage safe exploration Play word games, read, sing and expand on children's words Provide nutritious food and family meal times Promote good health habits and dental hygiene Maintain routines with flexibility Continue well-child check ups
AT THIS AGE: 2 3 Years
Children Are: Developing reasoning and problem
solving skills Learning to share and respect the rights
of others

Learning to feed and dress themselves Developing interest in books Developing counting and matching skills Developing pre-writing skills
Adults Can: Explain consequences of behavior so
children can learn "whys" Encourage sharing and taking turns Let children work out problems
independently Provide a variety of materials such as
blocks, puzzles and modeling clay Expose children to a variety of books,
stories, poems and rhymes Play number games Encourage children to serve themselves,
set the table, wash their hands Begin dental check-ups Maintain routines with flexibility Continue well-child check ups
AT THIS AGE: 3 4 Years
Children Are: Developing vocabulary rapidly Beginning to develop
conversation skills Showing interest in problem solving Becoming increasingly comfortable
interacting with adults Naturally curious, active learners Motivated to explore and discover
Adults Can: Talk to children throughout the day Make up silly words and rhymes Provide materials to sort and group Show children how to take apart and put
things back together Talk about things that are better to do
outside rather than inside Help children describe how things feel
(soft, sticky, hard, wet, dry) Write down stories that children tell Maintain routines with flexibility Continue with well-child check ups
AT THIS AGE: 4 5 Years
Children Are: Beginning to converse about objects
and events Continually asking questions about things
they encounter Developing creativity and humor Beginning to use simple strategies to
solve problems Engaging in conversations with
familiar adults Enjoying creating art

Adults Can: Talk about "What happened today" Tell simple jokes Encourage play with "old" toys in new ways Play listening and guessing games Have children help to serve snacks
and meals Take children to special events (the zoo, the
circus, story hours at the library) Ask questions about everyday objects
("What do you do with a fork?" "What animal says meow?") Maintain routines with flexibility Continue well-child check ups
AT THIS AGE: 5 Years
Children Are: Developing use of words to name or
describe many things Beginning to ask questions about topics
being discussed Beginning to use and explain strategies to
solve problems Showing affection to familiar adults Developing strong ideas about what they
want to do Expressing feelings and ideas verbally and
through artwork
Adults Can: Encourage children to describe and ask
questions about daily events Have children plan, "How many do we need
(spoons to eat with? chairs to sit in?)" Allow choices Provide a variety of writing and
reading materials Play guessing games with children Have children help with routine tasks Teach children family names, phone
numbers and addresses Practice safety habits Model and encourage healthy
nutrition habits Maintain routines with flexibility Continue well-child check ups
These excerpts, from the Better Brains for Babies website, 2002, are used with permission.
Better Brains for Babies is a Georgia-based collaboration of state and local, public and private organizations dedicated to improving the potential of young children by promoting the use of early brain development research in everyday life experiences.

For more child care information, please call GACCRRA at 800-466-5681.

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FAMILY TIME: Accept NO Substitute
Patricia A. Frey, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

One of the most important things parents can do for their children is spend time with them. That's the opinion of Emanuel Doyne, M.D., an Eastgate pediatrician who has been attending to the physical and emotional well being of children for 27 years.
"Parents may not be aware of it, but they're the main role models for their children," said Dr. Doyne, also Associate Director of the Division of Community Pediatrics at Children's Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati. "By their example, parents teach children how to deal with the world and how to parent their own children when they reach adulthood."
"Whether they plan special activities for their children or spend unstructured time with them doesn't matter, as long as they're with them," he said.
One natural time for families to be together is mealtime, according to Blake Bowden, Ph.D., and a clinical psychologist in the Division of Developmental Disorders at Cincinnati Children's Hospital. His study of 527 teens revealed that one major lifestyle difference between `adjusted' and `non-adjusted' teens was that the former ate more meals each week with their families.
"Through their example, busy parents can instruct their children about priorities. By taking time to eat a family meal, they're saying, 'Even though I have 15 projects at work or repairs to do around home, I'm going to spend this time with you,'" he said.
"But eating together doesn't mean sitting around the table watching television or reading a newspaper," Dr. Bowden stressed. "Whether it's at mealtime or not, the time parents spend with children should be child-focused and include positive, respectful sharing."

Mealtime is just one `key time' when parental presence adds to the quality of life. A 1997 survey of 12,118 teens concluded that if they felt close to their parents, teens were less likely to engage in risky behaviors, such as violence and drug use. They experienced less emotional distress if parents were present "at waking, after school, at dinner and at bedtime," according to the study sponsored by the American Medical Association.
"Family time will vary according to the age and interests of children," said Dr. Doyne. Elementary school children enjoy activities such as birthday parties, outings to the zoo or sports events. As their children move into adolescence, parents can bond during activities that reflect mutual interests, whether that's helping with aging grandparents or supporting local recycling efforts. Parental time with children should include both parents, even if children live with only one.
"Just the presence of the non-custodial parent in a child's life is the best gift," said Dr. Bowden. "A holiday or birthday filled with expensive gifts is never a substitute for parental presence."
"At all stages of a child's development, it's important that fathers and mothers create an atmosphere where children can talk about what's on their minds," Dr. Doyne noted. "Let them know you're there for them when they want to share."
Especially at the beginning and end of adolescence, Dr. Bowden's study revealed, teens crave adult contact. Even though teens may sometimes be hesitant about communicating, parents need to keep talking and listening during the time they've set aside for their children.
How much time is enough family time? Dr. Doyne said recent studies have put to rest the "quality vs. quantity time" debate, confirming that families with two working parents can be as productive and welladjusted as those with one stay-at-home parent.
"Feeling guilty that you're not spending enough time with your children is self-defeating," he said. "Whether it's 15 minutes or three hours a day, do the best you can with the time you have."

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For more health care information, please call the Powerline at 800-822-2539.

5 Principles of
POWERFUL PARENTING
Parenting can get very confusing in today's world. Here are five valuable tips on how to approach the overwhelming amount of parenting information available to parents today.
1. You are the only expert when it comes to raising your child.
`Experts' are only resources to help you on your parenting journey. Use what seems helpful. Rework parenting suggestions to fit your personal style, your child's individual personality and your current family situation. Don't get too caught up with doing everything `the right way' children listen far better with their hearts than with than ears.
2. If something isn't broken, don't fix it. Have you ever gotten advice
not to do something that seems to work in your family? Ignore the message for now. If something is truly wrong for your family, you will get other unmistakable signals that it's time for a change. Behaviors will start to escalate until they cannot be ignored any longer. You will begin to question if you are growing with your child's changing needs. Focus on today. You have plenty of time to deal with future problems in the future.
3. Be yourself. Parents are individuals. The key to successful parenting
is to parent from within yourself. A good parent, at one time or another, stands alone when everyone else thinks she's lost her mind.
Trust that the person you are will be an invaluable influence in the life of your child. Go ahead compare yourself to others watch, learn

and grow from what you see. But always come back to sharing your true self with your children. Children need real people around them if they are going to grow into real people themselves.
4. No one can parent 24-7 forever. Parents require practical and
emotional support for a very demanding job. Noone can raise children isolated within her own home and remain sane. You must take care of your needs if you plan on being there to take care of your children. Build yourself a support network with relatives, friends, mommy & me classes, or within a school community. You are not alone in the challenges and joys of living with children.
5. Never judge another mother or father. Parenting is not about
`getting it right.'
Parenting is about having the emotional and practical resources to do what it takes everyday over a long period of time to raise your child to his or her fullest potential.
Criticism destroys a parent's foundation for success. Accept that everyone brings something different to the parenting experience.
We are all learning together.
Family Time Inc. 2003 Karen Deerwester is the owner of Family Time Coaching & Consulting and the president of the Broward Association for the Education of Young Children. Currently, Karen is the Mommy & Me director at The Ruth and Edward Taubman Early Childhood Center at B'Nai Torah Congregation in Boca Raton and is also the parent expert writer for BlueSuitMom.com.

Georgia Childcare and School Immunization Requirements exist because we care about your child and about ALL the children in Georgia. Most of the 11 vaccines routinely recommended to help protect children from 15 potentially harmful diseases are required for childcare and school attendance:

DIVISION OF PUBLIC HEALTH

The number of doses needed depends upon the child's medical history, previous vaccinations, and also his/her age at school or childcare entrance. It is important to stay on schedule with regular visits to your medical provider for routine checkups and to have your child's immunization status evaluated. Contact your medical provider or the local health department to obtain any needed vaccines and the GA Immunization Certificate (Form 3231) required for entrance to school or childcare.

VACCINE DTaP IPV MMR
Varicella Hepatitis B
Hib Pneumococcal Heptatitis A
Influenza Meningococcal
Rotavirus

PROTECTS AGAINST Diphtheria,Tetanus, Pertussis
Polio Measles, Mumps, and Rubella
Chicken pox Hepatitis B Haemophilus influenzae type b Pneumococcal disease Hepatitis A Influenza Meningococcal disease Rotavirus

http://health.state.ga.us/programs/immunization/

For more child care information, please call GACCRRA at 800-466-5681.

13

The Brain: An Organ of
Major Importance

At the time of birth, the brain is not completely developed. In fact, it is just beginning its largest growth. It begins to grow while the fetus is in the womb and continues to grow throughout a person's life. However, most of the brain's growth occurs in the very first years of life.
Recent brain research confirms that children begin learning even before they are born and early interactions and experiences play a vital role in brain development. That is why it is so important for parents and those who care for children to know some of the basic facts about brain development and what they can do to help a baby's brain develop before and after birth. This information is vital for policy makers as well, so that our state's policies and practices for the health, education and care of infants and children are the best they can be.
Brain Development
The brain grows (develops) in a predictable sequence from the least complex functions to the most complex. The interaction of our genetic inheritance (nature) and environment (nurture) determines how our brain will develop. Our experiences affect how our brain develops. What we see, hear, smell, taste and touch are experiences which make connections in our brains and make us smarter. Connections that we repeat become stronger. Connections that we don't use repeatedly or often enough simply go away, an action called pruning. The brain "grows" by developing brain cells, called neurons. Every baby is born with approximately 100 billion neurons. A baby's neurons grow when parents, family members and caregivers talk to, sing to, read to and touch the baby. The more the infant is held, talked to and rocked, the faster the baby's brain grows and develops.
Before a baby's brain cells can grow, the baby must have food, a safe, healthy place to live and a nurturing caregiver. The relationships that children have with adults and others are critically important to the healthy development of the baby's brain.
Child Development
Parents are the most important people in a child's life. As parents you greatly influence your child's learning and development physically, emotionally, socially and cognitively.
Just as the sun rises and sets everyday in a predictable order, children develop in predictable ways. Knowing the basic principles of development and the characteristics of children's development at different ages make it easier for parents and caregivers to know what to expect of children and helps them learn what to do to help a child develop all her abilities.
The basic principles of child development are:
A child will develop in four (4) ways: physically, socially, emotionally and cognitively. These are known as the four domains of development. The domains are all related to each other. What happens in one domain is influenced by development in other domains.
A child develops in a rather orderly sequence. Later skills and knowledge build on the child's early skills and knowledge.
Each child is unique. Each child will develop at his or her own rate, and development within an area can be bumpy.

A child's early experiences will affect him now and later. Children develop in predictable directions from simple to more complex. Children learn by doing. They need to smell the lemon, to run, to pick
things up and drop them. Children and their development is influenced by lots of things
family, friends, churches, neighborhoods, etc. Children are products of both their heredity and their interactions
with others in their environment. Play is absolutely essential for children to develop and to learn. Children must practice a skill in order to learn it. They must also be
challenged with a skill that is a little more difficult when they master the current skill. Children will demonstrate what they know in many different ways. Different children learn different things in different ways. Some children learn best by listening (auditory); some by seeing (visual); and some need to touch to learn. The best way for a child to learn is the way that works best for him. Children must have their physical needs met, and feel safe and valued, in order to develop and learn.
It is important to know what behaviors are usual and expected for children at different ages. For example, expecting a three year old to be able to eat a meal without spilling something is unrealistic. Know common characteristics for children at different ages. Knowing the usual and expected behaviors of children will help you know what is ordinary and what to expect.
These excerpts, from the Better Brains for Babies website, 2002, are used with permission.
Better Brains for Babies is a Georgia-based collaboration of state and local, public and private organizations dedicated to improving the potential of young children by promoting the use of early brain development research in everyday life experiences.

14

For more health care information, please call the Powerline at 800-822-2539.

DISCIPLINE
& Young Children
You can begin laying the groundwork for good behavior from the time your child is born. When you respond to your infant's cries, you are teaching her that you are there, you can be counted on when she needs you, and that she can trust you. When your child is about two months of age, start to modify your responses and encourage your baby to establish good sleeping patterns by letting her fall asleep on her own. By keeping a reasonably steady schedule, you can guide her toward eating, sleeping and playing at times that are appropriate for your family. This lays the groundwork for acceptable behavior later on.

other adults interact. If they see adults relating in a positive way toward one another, they will learn that this is how others should be treated. This is how children learn to act respectfully.
Even though your children's behavior and values seem to be on the right track, your children will still challenge you because it is in their nature and is a part of growing up. Children are constantly learning what their limits are, and they need their parents to help them understand those limits. By doing so, parents can help their children feel capable and loved, learn right from wrong and develop good behavior and a positive approach toward life.
Used with permission of the American Academy of Pediatrics, copyright 2007. For more information, please visit their website: www.aap.org.

Once your baby starts to crawl (between 6 and 9 months of age) and as she learns to walk (between 9 and 16 months of age), safety is the most critical discipline issue. The best thing you can do for your child at this age is to give her the freedom to explore certain things and make other things off-limits. For example, put childproof locks on some cabinets, such as those that contain heavy dishes or pots, but leave other cabinets open. Fill the open cabinets with plastic containers or soft materials that your child can play with. This feeds your baby's need to explore and practice but in safe ways that are acceptable to you.

You will need to provide extra supervision during this period. If your child moves toward a dangerous object, such as a hot stove, simply pick her up, firmly say, "no, hot" and offer her a toy to play with instead. She may laugh at first as she tries to understand you but after a few weeks she will learn.

Discipline issues become more complex at about 18 months of age. At this time, a child wants to know how much power she has and will test the limit of that power over and over again. It is important for parents to decide together what those limits will be and stick to them. Parents need to be very clear about what is acceptable behavior. This will reduce the child's confusion and her need to test. Setting consistent guidelines for children when they are young also will help establish important rules for the future.

Many parents think discipline and punishment are the same thing. However, they are really quite different. Discipline is a whole system of teaching based on a good relationship, praise and instruction for the child on how to control his behavior. Punishment is negative; an unpleasant consequence for doing or not doing something. Punishment should only be a very small part of discipline.

Effective discipline should take place all the time, not just when children misbehave. Children are more likely to change their behavior when they feel encouraged and valued, not shamed and humiliated. When children feel good about themselves and cherish their relationship with their parents, they are more likely to listen and learn.

Telling your child how to behave is an important part of discipline, but showing her how to behave is even more significant. Children learn a lot about temper and self-control from watching their parents and

For more child care information, please call GACCRRA at 800-466-5681.

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Raising a Reader, Raising a Writer
As parents, we want our children to be safe and healthy. We want them to be happy. And we want our kids to learn whatever they need to succeed. High on everyone's list of essential skills are reading and writing. Here are some things simple and powerful that a parent can do.
1. Talk, sing and play with your child.
Expand on what the child says. (When your toddler says, "Duck!" you might respond with, "Do you want your yellow duck?")
Talk while you do simple everyday things together bathing, eating, chores and errands, watching TV, riding in the car or on the bus.
Recite nursery rhymes and do finger plays, games and action songs such as patty-cake and "This Little Pig Went to Market," frequently repeating the child's favorites.
Describe the child's activities.
2. Make time to read together each day.
Don't forget reading time with dad or granddad (or other men in the child's family or circle of friends.) Since teachers and librarians whom young children meet are usually women, some boys start thinking of reading as a `girl thing' and turn off to books and reading.
Bring a few books when you take kids along on errands, especially those where you're likely to have time on your hands.
3. Choose books with care.
As you look through possible book choices, involve your child in deciding what to bring home.
Look for books that relate to what's happening in the child's life at the time, whether it's a family trip or a new experience such as starting school.
4. Surround your child with reading material.
Consider subscribing to a good children's magazine. Kids love having something come in the mail for them! Also, libraries often loan children's magazines.
Help your preschooler create a book of her own, with drawings, photos or other items having meaning for her. She may want you to write what she says about each page, or she may choose to do her own writing scribbles or spellings of her own invention. Encourage her to `read' her book to other family members or friends.
5. Slow down and have fun.
Read at a leisurely pace with pauses here and there. This gives kids time to take in what they hear, mull it over and imagine the people, places and events.
Occasionally pose a question or make a remark that will prompt the child to think, express himself or relate the story to his own experience.

Follow the child's cues. Sometimes children are caught up in the story, particularly the first time through, and don't want stops and detours along the way. At other times, they're ready to chat about the story or pictures and speculate about what-if or whatnext questions.
Now and then try skipping an expected phrase to see if the child supplies it, for instance, when you say, "But the baby bear's chair was," the child may sing out, "Just right!" Books with such repetition and predictable patterns are great for preschoolers and early readers.
6. Read it again...and again.
Suggest that they tape themselves reading children's stories.
7. Foster your child's awareness of print and how we use it.
Print your child's name on her lunch box and other belongings while she watches. Explain that the label will help everyone know that the item is hers.
Talk about everyday print. ("Let's go here. The sign says Pizza Parlor.") Point out letters and words and encourage your child to find
them in books and all around (on games, packages and many other places.) Challenge your child to be a print detective. ("Can you tell what cereal I've written on the list?")
8. Provide a variety of writing tools and materials.
Stock a writing area with scrap paper, used greeting cards, bank forms, mail-order forms, envelopes and little notebooks.
Provide different kinds of markers, crayons, pencils and other writing tools.
Allow children to use a computer or typewriter to write. For some children the handwriting process itself is so laborious that they don't write unless they have to.
9. Don't push or pressure children about what or
when to read.
Don't nag your child to read. You'll defeat your purpose. If you're doing lots of the other things on this list, your child will get interested in reading.
Take turns picking the bedtime book and choose good books that are very popular with children of your child's age and interests.
10. Show children that you value their efforts.
Display your child's writing prominently and show how much you enjoy and value it.
Ask your child to read to you, a younger sibling or a special visitor. If a child makes a mistake when reading aloud, don't interrupt. If
the mistake doesn't change the meaning, let it go. Make sure you read some of the books your children enjoy, even
when they read very well themselves, so you can share your reactions and pleasure together. Respond positively to the message in your children's writing rather than focus on handwriting or spelling. Talk with children about the reading and writing they are doing at school.
This article was adapted from the brochure Raising a Reader, Raising a Writer from the National Association for the Education of Young Children and the International Reading Association. For information on NAEYC, call toll-free (800) 424-2460 or visit them online at www.naeyc.org.

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You can help
improve early education in your community.
Donate to Quality Care for Children to assist with their mission
to expand the capacity of parents, child care providers and communities to nurture and educate infants and young children.
You can make your tax-deductible donation online at http://www.qualitycareforchildren.org/donate.htm
$50 would assist a parent in finding quality child care $250 would purchase a new learning kit for the child care lending library $1,000 would assist a family in crisis to pay for child care
Education When It Matters Most

Is my child ready for
KINDERGARTEN?
Decide if your child should go this fall
by Brenda Nixon

Kindergarten is an exciting, anxious milestone for you and your child! And it's only natural to wonder, "Is my child ready?" Even being an educator, the mother in me questioned this when our first daughter approached school age. Imagine my surprise, and bruised pride, when early into the school year I was told she lagged behind in some kindergarten skills!
Wise parents know their child's early classroom experiences shape a lifetime attitude about school and learning. So it's critical that your child is ready for kindergarten and has positive learning experiences.
The word `readiness' means your child's readiness to learn, rather than just knowing some academics or being 5 years old. Frequently, parents drill their child with numbers, shapes, colors and printing assuming this makes their child ready for kindergarten. And, as I share with parents in my toilet-teaching presentation, you cannot let a calendar alone tell you when your child is ready for a milestone. Attention must be given to emotional, physical and social development as well.
Begin early in the spring watching for the following skills and behaviors. These will help you decide if your child will be ready by the fall.
A child who is ready for kindergarten:
interacts easily with other children, understands the concept of `friend,' can name at least one friend
handles crayons, chalk, pencils, scissors properly performs self-help tasks without assistance, such as
dressing/undressing, brushing teeth, preparing cereal, picking up toys and clothes, making his/her bed says "please" and "thank you" 50 percent of the time without reminders can sit still, even for a few minutes (don't count TV viewing time) listens and follows directions takes turns, follows rules, plays in a group knows his/her and your name, address, age and telephone number knows left from right (differs by school district) speaks in complete sentences and speech is understandable to others not living in your home, such as neighbors, Sunday school teacher, grandparents asks questions, is eager to know and is curious runs, jumps, swings, peddles tricycle, walks on tip-toe, balances on one foot is physically similar in size to others the same age, not unusually small falls asleep easily and sleeps all night; some nightmares or grumpy mornings are common generally accepts adult authority, occasional resistance is healthy while unfailing obedience or over-compliance is not demonstrates confidence in his/her ability to cope with new situations recognizes 1 10 numerals can take turns

Remember, size, physical abilities and emotional development are important reasons to send or withhold him/her from kindergarten. Be honest in your appraisal of his/her skills progress and unique personality.
Ask your child's preschool teacher what he/she has observed. Gather as much objective information on your child as possible. Then talk with the school principal, counselor and kindergarten teacher to get their recommendations.
At one school, a kindergarten teacher told me most children come to her printing in all capitals. But she wants children printing in upperand lower-case letters. She spends the first half of the year breaking their habit. Some programs, like Montessori, prefer children write in cursive while others discourage this at the kindergarten level. Get to know your school district's practices.
Doing your homework early in the year can take pressure off any last minute decision. If you feel your child is ready but lacks a skill, you have the summer to get him/her ready. Practice with writing and cutting instruments, visit the library frequently, talk to your child about kindergarten. Acquaint your child with the school building. Make sure immunizations are up to date.
Trust your observations and instincts. Keeping your child's best interests in mind, don't prohibit him/her from going because of: your own separation difficulties your neighbors and friends are doing it you think he/she can excel in a group of young children next year
One teacher said some kids come to kindergarten bigger but still not ready to learn.
If you decide to hold your child back, reassure him/her that he/she hasn't failed you or himself/herself. Explain that everyone develops at his/her own pace and not going to kindergarten now is the best decision for him/her. This minimizes competition and teaches him/her to value his/her uniqueness.
If you think your child is ready but not 5 years old yet, contact the school district for early entrance policies. Some schools give testing for early entrance. Others offer a transitional pre-K class.
All educators agree that once you decide your child is ready for kindergarten, get involved! Go to the first Open House Night, PTA meetings and schedule parent/teacher conferences. Not only does this send a message to your child that school is important but teachers do form impressions about your interest in your child based on school function attendance.
2000, rev. 2004, Brenda Nixon. Brenda Nixon (www.brendanixon.com) is a speaker and columnist on parenting and family issues. She is a contributing writer to 14 books and the author of Parenting Power in the Early Years, a resource for early childhood parents and teachers.

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Ten Ways to
Nurture Tolerance
1. Talk about tolerance.
Tolerance is an ongoing process; it cannot be captured in a single moment. Establish a high "comfort level" for open dialogue about social issues. Let children know that no subject is taboo.
2. Identify intolerance when children are exposed to it.
Point out stereotypes and cultural misinformation depicted in movies, TV shows, computer games and other media. Challenge bias when it comes from friends and family members. Do not let the moment pass. Begin with a qualified statement: "Andrew just called people of XYZ faith 'lunatics.' What do you think about that, Zoe?" Let children do most of the talking.
3. Challenge intolerance when it comes from your children.
When a child says or does something that reflects biases or embraces stereotypes, point it out: "What makes that joke funny, Jerome?" Guide the conversation toward internalization of empathy and respect "Mimi uses a walker, honey. How do you think she would feel about that joke?" or "How did you feel when Robbie made fun of your glasses last week?"
4. Support your children when they are the victims of intolerance.
Respect children's troubles by acknowledging when they become targets of bias. Don't minimize the experience. Provide emotional support and then brainstorm constructive responses. Develop a set of "comebacks" for children who are victims of name-calling.
5. Foster a healthy understanding of group identities.
For tweens and teens, group identity is critical. Remind them, however, of three things. First, pride in our own groups does not mandate disrespect for others. Second, no group is entitled to special privileges. Third, we should avoid putting other groups down as a way to elevate the status of our own groups.
6. Showcase diversity materials in your home.
Read books with multicultural and tolerance themes to your children. Assess the cultural diversity reflected in your home's artwork, music and literature. Add something new. Give multicultural dolls, toys or games as gifts. Bookmark equity and diversity Web sites on your home computer.
7. Create opportunities for children to interact with people who are different from them.
Look critically at how a child defines "normal." Expand the definition. Visit playgrounds where a variety of children are present people of different races/ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, family structures, etc. Encourage a child to spend time with elders -

grandparents, for example. Attend religious services at a variety of houses of worship.
8. Encourage children to call upon community resources.
The earlier children interact with the community, the better; we are not islands unto ourselves. If a child is interested in stars, visit the local library, museum or planetarium. A child who is concerned about world hunger can volunteer at a local soup kitchen or homeless shelter.
9. Be honest about differences. Do not tell children that we are all the same; we're not.
We experience the world in different ways, and those experiences matter. Help your child understand the viewpoints of others.
10. Model the behavior you would like to see.
As parents and as children's primary role models, we must be consistent in how we treat others and in our commitment to tolerance. If we as parents treat people differently based on characteristics such as race or gender, our children are likely to do the same.
FIGHT HATE. PROMOTE TOLERANCE. TOLERANCE.ORG a web project of the southern poverty law center www.tolerance.org/parents/
Parent Infant Network for Educational Services
Department of Education www.gapines.net A Family-Centered Intervention Program for Families of Infants and Toddlers with Sensory Loss
Hearing Loss Vision Impairments Sensory Loss
including Multiple Disabilities Deafblind Collaboration partnerships, management of sensory device, development of auditory and vision potential, facilitation in communication and cognitive development
For more information, or to make a referral to Georgia PINES,
call: 800-522-8652 or 404-298-4882
All services are free.

For more child care information, please call GACCRRA at 800-466-5681.

19

Play is FUNdamental

Crawling under the kitchen table playing bear cave with your child may not seem to be intellectually stimulating, but recent studies have shown that such activities are fundamental to his or her development. Play enables children to become eager learners and well-rounded individuals.

You may be wondering if you should search for educational software instead of crawling under that table. Can this really be stimulating your child's intellect? Can a child who stacks up blocks and then knocks them over, or a child who scribbles with a marker, really be learning? You bet!

Children learn about geometry and gravity, shapes and balance when they play with blocks. Scribbling enables children to perfect muscle control, leads them toward drawing and writing and helps them see cause and effect. And playing bear cave allows the child to look at the world from a very different perspective.

Play is Part of Life
Through play, children explore their world, discover how to get along with others, test their skills and muscles, try out new ideas and feel competent enough to try different activities.

Observations of your own children's play will soon confirm how much they are learning.

When we enrich children's play, they learn

Cooperation Language

Problem Solving Mathematics

And they develop
Curiosity Strength and Coordination Values

Self-esteem Self-direction

Questions Facing Parents
As technology and society change, parents face some tough decisions about their children's play. Your own observations of play and the guidelines here may help you make good decisions about play choices for your children.

What toys are educational? The more the child can do with the toy, the more likely it is to be truly educational. Children need to learn a lot about people and how things work before they are ready to count and learn to read. Make sure you offer play materials that give children choices and room to explore. Even a good primary school program bases its curriculum on play, not on paper and pencils.

Is superhero play good for children? A little of it probably is. It can give children a sense of power and strength, of doing good deeds. But it also can escalate into hurting and out-of-control violence. Some adult direction may be needed to help children maintain control.

How much television should children watch? What children watch is equally important as how much children watch. Some shows, such as nature specials or the high quality programming on public television, can be positive learning experiences for children. Children learn best from testing out ideas and interacting with people and objects. Do the programs your children watch provide these opportunities?
Are computers good toys? Look back at the criteria for play. If your child actively enjoys using a computer some of the time for writing or playing games, it probably is not harmful. On the other hand, a steady diet of nothing but war games probably will not help your child grow up to be the kind of person you would like.
What rules do children need when they play? Try to provide as few as possible to foster productive play. Most problems with play are covered by these three simple rules: 1. People are not for hurting. 2. Conflicts are resolved by talking. 3. Everything must be returned to its proper place.
How do I join in my child's play? We are our children's first playmates. We play peek-a-boo, engage in back-and-forth babbling and exchange playful splashes in the bath. We may meow like a kitten or sip from an empty teacup, saying, "Ummm." And the child sees some of the many possibilities that open up in that play.
Some grownups are quite at home getting down on all fours for a lively game of tiger; others are less inclined to rambunctious play and flights of fancy. But anyone of us can join in a tea party or shop in the child's grocery store. You and your child can build with blocks, play chase or hide-and-seek and enjoy simple games like Go Fish or Candyland. What matters is that you enjoy yourselves!
This article was adapted from the National Association for the Education of Young Children's brochure #576, Play is FUNdamental.
For more information on NAEYC, call toll-free (800) 424-2460 or visit them online at www.naeyc.org.

20

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Kids, Sports, and Exercise

There is no question that exercise is good for growing children, and the earlier they start, the better. But is it advisable for 6-year-olds to play team football? Should you encourage an uncoordinated child to take up gymnastics? It's important to remember that it's OK if children are not interested in certain sports as long as they pursue activities that help them stay physically fit. The key is finding activities they like to do, that are fun, and that get them moving! And don't overlook the other benefits your child will be receiving from exercise - including learning to share, making friends, and developing self-esteem.
What Parents Can Do
Try to concentrate on your child's successes, rather than her failures. Your child may not be able to swim well, but she may be a terrific skater and basketball player. Praise what she does well and provide plenty of opportunities for her to succeed. Introduce new activities, especially if she shows interest. Try to attend your child's games and meets as much as possible to encourage her and provide support. Whenever possible, parents should participate in fitness activities with their children. When a family rides bicycles or snowboards together, parents act as role models and everyone has fun and gets some exercise. What could be better?
Sports and Exercise for Ages 6 and Under
If a child doesn't want to do something or doesn't seem ready, it's best not to push too hard. Just because the child next door can ride his twowheeler at age 5 doesn't mean your child should be able to do it, too. Children develop skills at different ages. Try not to draw too many comparisons between your child and other children. As long as she is developmentally on target, let her master skills at her own pace.

Sports and Exercise for Ages 7 and Up
Children should be at least age 7 or 8 before they engage in organized team sports, most experts say. It depends on the child, but many team sports are contact sports, and most children under age 7 aren't ready for rough contact. For them, the risk of physical injury is not the only concern. There's also the issue of winning and losing. Emotionally, losing at sports can be very hard, even for adults. At this age, it's more important that children have the chance to play than worry about who won and who lost.
Most experts agree that between the ages of 8 and 12 is the time to introduce competitive sports. Competitive sports include baseball or softball, soccer, field and ice hockey, tennis, swimming, gymnastics, basketball, and football, among others. Parents should be well informed about their child's chosen sport(s), including the proper protective gear to be worn and injury prevention techniques. Coaches can provide most of this information, but it's still a good idea for parents to know, so they can help kids perform well without getting hurt.
Using free weights or weight training equipment is not recommended unless a child is following an age-appropriate program and is supervised by a qualified professional.
Distance running should be postponed until adolescence. Even then, track programs for middle school-age children (sixth to eighth grade) usually limit running distances to 1/2 to 3/4 of a mile at a time. Age appropriateness for these activities varies depending upon the duration and intensity of the activity. It is always recommended that you consult your child's doctor for specific recommendations.

Some children shy away from sports because they're afraid of failure or easily frustrated. Again, you must look to your child for cues and you should provide encouragement, but never force an activity on an unwilling child. Wait 6 months and try again when the child feels more comfortable!

Some Suggested Activities for Ages 6 and Under

Gymnastics (tumbling) Wiffleball Swimming Kickball

Hopscotch Jumprope Karate Dancing

Playing Frisbee T-ball Tag

Some Suggested Activities for Ages 7 and Up

Baseball/softball Kickball Field hockey/ice hockey Tennis Dancing

Inline skating Basketball Soccer Lacrosse Gymnastics

Biking Football Wrestling Ice skating Easy hiking

This information was provided by KidsHealth, one of the largest resources online for medically reviewed health information written for parents, kids,and teens. For more articles like this one, visit www.KidsHealth.org or www.TeensHealth.org.
1995-2004. The Nemours Foundation

For more child care information, please call GACCRRA at 800-466-5681.

21

Working without Weaning:

A Mother's Guide to Breastfeeding

In order to combine breastfeeding and working, it helps to have practical information, the support of your employer and co-workers and the cooperation of your day care provider.
Successfully combining breastfeeding and working should actually begin long before the first day on the job. There are many things that you can do during your maternity leave that will improve the chances of continuing to breastfeed your baby after you return to work.
The following recommendations may make the transition back to work easier for mothers who continue to breastfeed.
Explore the possibility of a gradual return to work, if employment and personal circ*mstances permit:
Request as much time as possible or ask for a range of time. In general, the longer, the better. Four months is better than three months. Ten weeks is better than eight weeks. Six weeks is better than four.
Don't be afraid to ask for more time than you think will be granted or to explore part-time or job share possibilities. There may be opportunities that are not typically advertised that might be missed without asking.
Begin collecting and freezing excess milk before returning to work:
Become familiar with pumping options as early as possible, and begin expressing milk while at home on maternity leave. This can begin as soon as your milk supply is established, at around three to four weeks.
Use a hospital grade electric breast pump whenever possible; one with a double collection system will allow you to express milk from both breasts at once and save you valuable time. There are also smaller electric models, battery operated pumps and manual pumps. It is also possible to use hand expression.
Remember that babies need to nurse until they are content and, if all is going well, will typically gain 4 to 7 ounces per week. (Please check with your baby's pediatrician or primary care clinician to determine what type of weight gain is appropriate for your baby given his/her age, development and size.)
Try to recognize when you are experiencing a milk surplus and take advantage of this. After feeding the baby, pump or express the residual milk. Begin after a morning feeding when your milk supply is generally greater.
Pumping and freezing any extra milk will allow you to take advantage of and maintain a milk surplus and will help to condition the milk ejection reflex to be triggered by pumping or hand expression. (Guidelines for refrigeration and freezing of expressed breast milk can be found in a variety of publications including Breastfeeding: Your guide to a healthy, happy baby, by: Amy Spangler, RN, MN, IBCLC.)

Allow at least 2 weeks to prepare for the time when you will be away from your baby. Express breast milk at least once a day, and save your breast milk for your childcare provider to give your baby. Stockpile as much expressed milk as you can, at least enough milk to feed your baby the first day you return to work and to allow for the unexpected during the first few weeks (e.g., spills, missed pumping time at work, or a sudden increase in baby's consumption).
Introduce your baby to bottle feeding:
Introduce bottle-feeding to your baby after breastfeeding is well established (at least three to four weeks).
Plan a time when you can devote 10 to 15 uninterrupted minutes to this endeavor. Your baby will feel pressured if you are rushed. Choose a time when your baby is alert and slightly hungry, but not upset or frantic, so he/she will be motivated to learn a new way to receive milk.
Offer warm expressed breast milk in a clean bottle. Typically, it makes the most sense to stick with one type of nipple for several days to allow the baby time to accept it, although some babies prefer one nipple shape over another and you may need to experiment.
Don't spend more than about 10 minutes on this process, and stop sooner if the baby becomes frustrated. End the session on a positive note and try again the next day.
You may want to let another family member, such as dad, give the bottle, since your baby expects to be breastfed when you hold him/her.
Working with your Child Care Provider:
Ask whether your child's caregiver has cared for breastfed babies, and determine if he/she is willing to cooperate with you in your attempts to continue breastfeeding. Discuss how he/she feels about handling your breast milk, coping with a baby who may not take a bottle readily, feeding more frequently since breastmilk is more easily digested than formula, and not offering a bottle if you are due back shortly and could nurse on arrival.
Discuss recommendations for the storage and handling of your expressed breast milk.
Support is one of the key factors that enable many women to make the choices that give them the outcome they desire.
Resource List Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies (800) 822-2539 Women, Infants and Children (WIC) (800) 228-9173

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Prevent Child Abuse Georgia
Valuing Children, Strengthening Families and Engaging Communities

Prevent Child Abuse (PCA) Georgia is a statewide non-profit organization dedicated to preventing child abuse. PCA Georgia leads, supports and coordinates citizens and professionals in a comprehensive effort to end child abuse by making sure that children never experience maltreatment rather than waiting to provide assistance after they have been harmed.
Child abuse prevention is about strengthening the ability of parents and communities to care for their children's health and well-being. Positive partnerships between parents and early childhood programs help build this strength and form the foundation for a child's entry into the community and society at-large.
Early care and education programs reach a large number of very young children and their parents and have unique relationships with these families at a very important time in their child's physical, social, intellectual and emotional development.
Together, parents and early childhood caregivers form a powerful team that can: Keep children nurtured, healthy and safe; Facilitate friendships and mutual support; Respond to child and family needs;

Provide a link to the community, its resources and opportunities;
Build knowledge of parenting and child development; and
Ensure the social and emotional competence of children.
Children who are cared for and nurtured become adults who are caring and nurturing; and caring and nurturing adults build strong families who, in turn, build strong communities. That's prevention!
For more information about strengthening families and preventing child abuse, please call our HELPLINE at 1-800-CHILDREN
(244-5373), a confidential resource for information, support and referrals in your community available from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday
through Friday, or visit our website at www.pcageorgia.com 1720 Peachtree Street, N.W., Suite 600, Atlanta, GA 30309

Right from the Start
Medicaid Outreach Project

1-800-809-7276

HEALTHCARE COVERAGE FOR THE UNINSURED & UNDERINSURED
Doctor Visits Prescription Medicine
Immunizations Health Checkups
Dental Care Vision Care Prenatal Care and More...
Call 1-800-809-7276 for more information or to find an RSM location near you. Office hours are convenient so you can easily access the care your family needs. Staff will gladly assist with the Medicaid application process and the benefit programs listed in this ad. These programs are designed to help improve health outcomes in Georgia.

BENEFIT PROGRAMS
Low Income Medicaid (LIM): Healthcare coverage for eligible low-income children (under age 18) and the adult(s) who are responsible for them. www.dfcs.dhr.georgia.gov
Right from the Start Medicaid (RSM): Healthcare coverage for eligible children (up to age 19) and pregnant women. www.dfcs.dhr.georgia.gov/rsm
PeachCare for Kids (PCK): Healthcare coverage for eligible children (age 0 to 19). Those who are not eligible for Medicaid on the basis of family income may be eligible for PCK. Families pay a premium for children who are age 6 to 19. There is no premium for children under 6. www.peachcare.org
Women's Health Medicaid (WHM): Coverage for eligible uninsured or underinsured women under age 65 who have been screened and affirmatively diagnosed with breast or cervical cancer or some precancerous condition of the breast or cervix. www.dch.georgia.gov
Georgia Partnership for Caring (GPCF): A nonprofit network of healthcare providers assist with prescription medicine and one free visit to a primary care physician. www.gacares.org

For more child care information, please call GACCRRA at 800-466-5681.

23

Choosing
Quality Child Care
Begin by visiting several early care and learning providers. On each visit, think about your first impression and:
1. Look
Does the facility or home look safe for your child? Do the caregivers/teachers enjoy talking and playing with children? Do they talk with each child at the child's eye level? Are there plenty of toys and learning materials within the child's reach?
2. Listen
How does the child care setting sound? Do the children sound happy and involved? What about the teacher's voices; are they cheerful and patient? A place that's too quiet may mean not enough activity. A place that's too noisy may mean there is a lack of control.
3. Count
Count the number of children in the group, then count the number of staff members caring for them. Obviously, the fewer the number of children to each adult, the more attention your child will receive. A small number of children per adult is most important for babies and younger children.
4. Ask
It's very important that the adults who care for your children have the knowledge and experience to give them quality care. Ask about the background and experience of all staff, including the program director, caregivers, teachers and any other adults who will have contact with your child in the home or center.
5. Be Informed
Find out about efforts in your community to improve the quality of child care. Is your caregiver/provider involved in the activities to improve quality?
6. Choose
Consider your options: child care centers, family child care homes, Head Start, Pre-Kindergarten, school-age programs and summer camps.
7. Call
Before making a final decision on a program, call to find out if that center has had any violations and, if so, what they are.
CONSIDER YOUR OPTIONS
Your first question should be, "What type of care best meets my child's needs?" Several types are available outside the home. Each offers its own benefits:
Child Care Center
This is care and educational activity offered to a group of children in a non-residential setting accommodating more than 18 children.
Child Care Home
This is care and educational activity offered to a group of 6 children or less in the home of a person who provides the care and is registered. Group child care homes can accommodate up to 18 children.
Head Start & Preschool Early Intervention
Programs are typically located on school campuses or are operated by a private provider and generally follow the school-year schedule.

School-Age Child Care
These are programs for children ages 5 through 12 covering out of school time. These may be in schools, child care centers, family child care homes, youth organizations and faith-based organizations.
Summer Camps
These camps are offered in public and private settings including counties and municipalities. Some programs may be exempt from licensing.
Child Care Checklist
Basics
License is displayed. Required staffing ratios are met. Written policies are available (including discipline policy). Group size is small enough to allow individual attention. The hours meet my needs.
Physical Facility
The room is bright, cheerful, clean and safe. Enough space is provided for activities. Children can get things themselves. There are enough toys, paints, books, etc. for all children. Equipment (chairs, tables, sinks, toilets) is all child size and in
good condition.
Staff
Caregivers have worked here for a year or more. Caregivers appear to enjoy what they do. Positive discipline techniques are used. Children are treated as individuals. Caregivers comfort the children when needed.
Parental Involvement
Parents may make surprise visits (open-door policy). Lines of communication between parents and staff are open. Parent participation is encouraged. Parents are notified if accidents occur.
Program
Daily schedule is posted. Quiet and active play opportunities are balanced. Activities are age-appropriate and address the children's needs
(physical, emotional, social and developmental). A variety of music is played during the day. The children have opportunities to be read to during each day. Rest/nap policy is reasonable.
Health and Safety
Emergency contacts are kept on file. Staff members have CPR/First Aid training. Staff observes safe hygiene (wash hands before and after
diapering each child and wiping faces). Staff members change gloves after each diaper change. Diaper changing pads are non-absorbent. Infants/toddlers are able to explore the environment safely.
(Checklist continues on next page)

24

For more health care information, please call the Powerline at 800-822-2539.

Training/Credentials
Staff members have participated in more than the required minimum training.
Lead teachers have a college degree in early childhood education or CDA Credential.
Family child care providers have NAFFC (National Association for Family Child Care) or CDA.
General Impression
Children seem happy here. I would feel comfortable leaving my child here. I would be happy here as a child. There is a calm and nurturing environment at this facility.

If you need assistance in your search for child care, contact your local Child Care Resource & Referral Agency (CCR&R) featured on pages 8 and 9 in this publication. They can assist you in locating care that meets your needs and arm you with
the information critical to your search.
You can also learn more about your CCR&R by contacting the Georgia Association of Child Care Resource & Referral
Agencies (GACCRRA) at 800-466-5681 or at www.gaccrra.org.

Inclusion/Mainstreaming

Information provided by: Openings Room for Everyone: Including ALL Children in Neighborhood Child Care,
August 1995, The Kennedy Center, Inc., Bridgeport, CT

What is Inclusion?
Inclusion, as a value, supports the right of all children, regardless of their diverse abilities, to participate actively in natural settings within their communities. A natural setting is one in which the child would spend time if he or she did not have a disability. Such settings include, but are not limited to, home and family child care, playgroups, child care centers and programs, Head Start and preschool programs, schools and neighborhood activities.
Why Inclusion?
Life is an integrated experience. A child with disabilities deserves to participate in normal life experiences, to which he or she is entitled, by virtue of being, first and foremost, a child.
Everyone benefits. We learn from each other and develop an appreciation for the differences among people.
It works. Research proves that with proper supports, children with disabilities grow both cognitively and socially.
It sticks. Preschool placement has been shown to predict subsequent placement at school age. Children from segregated preschool settings are more likely than those in integrated settings to retain their special education eligibility status and be placed in segregated classrooms when entering public schools.
It's backed by the law. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1990 (IDEA) and the Amendments to the Education of the Handicapped Act of 1986 embrace the concept that early intervention and education services are provided in natural environments where preschoolers without disabilities would participate.
What Makes Inclusion Successful?
A commitment to the philosophy of inclusion. A shared belief in the equal value of all students. Careful assessment and planning.
Collaboration. Equal partners among providers and specialists; peers involved as supports and friends; parents interacting with child care providers.
Flexibility. Teaching models altered; curriculums adapted; and unique needs addressed. ALL must be willing to accept compromise and try new situations.

Leadership. A positive attitude and a supportive environment set the tone. Teachers who are encouraged by their supervisors are often the most successful initiators of change.
Peer Relationships. Positive role models and the possibility of friendships.
Support. Everything necessary to meet the goals is established in the IFST or IEP. Additional personnel; a peer support network; adapted curricula; fluid teaching methods; physical accommodations; needed therapies.
Transition Planning. Appropriate provider training, a child familiar with his or her surroundings.
What Inclusion is NOT:
It is NOT just placing children in the same group, classroom or setting. Inclusion is active involvement that should be viewed as a process one that may require patience and perseverance, especially when creating and working within a new system.
It is NOT just putting a child with disabilities into a new group and expecting friendships to develop. Social interactions between children with disabilities and their peers without disabilities may not occur spontaneously or naturally. A systematic way of promoting social interactions and friendships must be built into the child care structure (i.e., verbalizations and prompts by staff promote social exchanges).
It is NOT expecting a child to do without the full array of support services they need. Active involvement of appropriate support personnel is necessary for successful inclusion to occur. Placing a child in an integrated setting does not imply that therapeutic services provided by any on-going specialist or consultant should not be provided. These services are essential for a child to reach his or her full potential.
It is NOT about acting alone. A strong partnership is a `must' between the child care provider and the support personnel. Frequent dialogue and cooperation are needed in implementing and modifying the education program and the environment. The support personnel need to be a resource to the child care provider as well as to the child and family.
It is NOT mainstreaming. Inclusion is more than mainstreaming. Mainstreaming implies that a child from a special education class visits the regular class for specific, usually non-academic subjects. Inclusion means that a child with disabilities is a part of a regular group or class.

For more child care information, please call GACCRRA at 800-466-5681.

25

Will you taYkoeutehaerCnereddiitt! this year? The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a tax credit for people who
work but do not earn high incomes. The EITC is a valuable tool helping eligible taxpayers to lower their taxes or to claim a refund. The IRS wants all eligible taxpayers to claim this credit.
Many taxpayers who qualify for EITC may also be eligible for free tax preparation and electronic filing by participating tax professionals and volunteers. Taxpayers and tax professionals should review the rules
$before attempting to claim the EITC.

one person, only one person can treat that child as a qualifying child and claim EITC.
IF YOU DON'T HAVE A CHILD, YOU MUST MEET THREE ADDITIONAL TESTS:
At the end of 2006, you must have been at least age 25, but under age 65.
You cannot qualify as the dependent of another person. You must have lived in the United States for more than half of 2006.

Do You Qualify for EITC?

Credit Limits for 2006 Tax Year

To qualify, you must meet certain requirements and file a U.S. Individual Income Tax Return. As described below, some EITC rules apply to everyone. There are also special rules for people who have children and for those who do not.

Income and family size determine the amount of the EITC. The Earned Income Credit Table, which shows the credit amounts, is included in the Instruction booklet for Form 1040 and in Publication 596, Earned Income Credit.

INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES MUST MEET CERTAIN

FOR 2006, THE MAXIMUM CREDIT AMOUNTS ARE:

$ How to Claim EITC GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:
You must have earned income. You must have a valid Social Security Number for yourself, your
spouse (if married filing jointly) and your qualifying child. Investment income is limited to $2,800. Your filing status cannot be "married filing separately." Generally, you must be a U.S. citizen or resident alien all year. You cannot be a qualifying child of another person. You cannot file Form 2555 or Form 2555-EZ (related to foreign
earned income).
YOUR INCOME CANNOT EXCEED CERTAIN LIMITATIONS.
For Tax Year 2006, you must have adjusted gross income of less than: $36,348 ($38,348 if married filing jointly) with two or more
qualifying children.

Two or more children $4,536 One child $2,747 No children $412
Publication 596, Earned Income Credit, explains the process. The publication is available at IRS.gov or by calling 1-800-829-3676. Publicaton 596 also is available in Spanish. The Instructions for Form 1040 can help you determine your eligibility. The instructions contain a worksheet and the earned income credit table to help you determine the amount of your credit. If you are claming the EITC with a qualifying child, you must complete Schedule EIC and attach it to your tax return. Schedule EIC provides IRS with information about your qualifying children, including their names, ages, SSNs, relationship to you and the amount of time they lived with you during the year.

$32,001 ($34,001 if married filing jointly) with one qualifying child.

$12,120 ($14,120 if married filing jointly) with no qualifying children.

How to Get Tax Help

IF YOU CLAIM A CHILD, HE OR SHE MUST MEET THREE ELIGIBILITY TESTS:

Taxpayers can find help in determining eligibility by using the new EITC Assistant on the IRS Web site.

Residency Test the child must have lived with you in the United

Taxpayers who qualify for EITC should explore available free tax

States for more than half of 2006.

preparation services. The IRS provides assistance to low-income

$ Relationship Test the child must be your son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, stepbrother, stepsister or a descendant of any of them. Your child includes: A foster child who was placed with you by an authorized placement agency, or by judgment, decree, or other order of any court of competent jurisdiction. A legally adopted child or a child lawfully placed with you for legal adoption Age test at the end of 2006, the child must have been under age
19, a full-time student under age 24 or any age if permanently and totally disabled at anytime during 2006.
Your qualifying child cannot be used by more than one person to claim EITC. If a child meets the rules to be a qualifying child of more than

taxpayers at more than 400 IRS offices nationwide. We also partner with local community and non-profit organizations to provide free tax return preparation for low-income and elderly taxpayers at more than 12,000 volunteer sites nationwide. Other options include the use of Free File, the free tax preparation and electronic filing program provided by software companies. Many e-file software providers and tax professionals also provide free services for low income taxpayers. To find a free tax site in your area, call the IRS at 1-800-906-9887. EITC recipients should remember they can get faster access to their refund by using direct deposit. If you use IRS e-file and direct deposit, you could have your refund in half the time of a paper return.
For quick and easy access to tax help, visit the IRS at www.irs.gov or call the IRS at 1-800-829-1040.

26

For more health care information, please call the Powerline at 800-822-2539.

Creating a Child Care and Home CONNECTION

Strategies for Building Partnerships
There are a variety of ways you can support your caregiver and be involved in your child's early education.
Ask your child's center or provider for the best ways to be in touch. Are there good times for phone calls? Is there a fax? Can you write notes back and forth? Is email available?
Be sure to give the caregiver(s) your phone number(s) and the best time to reach you. Take time to talk with your child's caregiver at the beginning or end of the day. It is also a good idea to plan time without children around to discuss how things are going. Offer to help out with special events or parent committees. Lend your expertise: fundraising, finances, human resources and
newsletters. Offer to send in a special snack for all the children. Loan the provider an interesting game or book. Learn about policies and funding that promote good child care and
speak out for these issues.

Consider, too, how important and powerful your sincere thank you can be. Two national initiatives, the Week of The Young Child and Provider Appreciation Day, are held each spring to recognize those people who impact the lives of children in a positive way. For more information about either of these events, contact your local Child Care Resource & Referral agency (pages 8 and 9 of this guide).
Family Friendly Policies at Work
More and more workplaces are developing creative flexibility solutions for their employees. An increasing number of employers realize that policies friendly to families benefit everyone. Some companies offer flexible work schedules that offer paid time off for employees wishing to attend a school event. Find out if your employer has volunteer opportunities, creative partnerships with schools or parenting workshops and seminars.
To schedule parenting workshops or seminars at your place of work, contact your local CCR&R agency.

The Office of Child Support Services can:
Help you get child support; Help get the name of your child's father on
legal records; Change court orders that award child support; and Enforce child support orders. Anyone with legal custody of a child who needs help to get child support payments can apply. There is a $25 application fee.

For an application or information about your case, visit us online at:
http://ocse.dhr.georgia.gov
Select "Constituent Services Portal"
In the 478, 706, 762 or 912 area codes:
1-800-227-7993
In the 404, 678 or 770 area codes:
404-463-8800

Office of Child Support Services Georgia Department of Human Resources

For more child care information, please call GACCRRA at 800-466-5681.

27

Escogiendo una guardera infantil

Comience visitando varios proveedores de guardera. En cada visita, piense acerca de su primera impresin y acerca de:
1. Observe
El lugar parece seguro para su hijo? Los educadores/maestros disfrutan el hablar y jugar con
los nios? Hablan con cada uno de los nios al nivel de la vista de los nios? Hay bastantes juguetes y material de aprendizaje al alcance de
los nios?
2. Escuche
Cmo suena el ambiente de la guardera? Los nios suenan felices e involucrados? Qu tal suenan las voces de los maestros? Suenan alegres y pacientes? Un lugar demasiado quieto puede significar que no hay
suficiente actividad. Un lugar demasiado ruidoso puede significar falta de control.

3. Cuente
Cuente el nmero de nios en el grupo, despus cuente el nmero de personas a cargo de ellos. Obviamente, entre menor el nmero de nios por adulto, mayor ser la atencin que su nio recibir. Un nmero pequeo de nios por adulto es muy importante para bebes y nios pequeos.
4. Pregunte
Es muy importante que los adultos que cuidarn de sus hijos tengan el conocimiento y la experiencia para darles cuidado de calidad. Pregunte acerca de la preparacin y la experiencia de todo el personal, incluyendo el director del programa, cuidadores, maestros y cualquier otro adulto que tenga contacto con su nio en la guardera.
5. Infrmese
Investigue acerca de los esfuerzos en su comunidad para mejorar la calidad del cuidado infantil. Su cuidador/cuidadora est involucrada en las actividades para mejorar la calidad?

28

Para ms informacin sobre el cuidado de la salud, favor de llamar a Powerline al 800-822-2539.

6. Escoja
Considere sus opciones: centros de cuidado infantil, casas de cuidado infantil familiares, programas Head Start, Pre-Kindergarten, Cuidado Infantil de Edad Escolar y campamentos de verano.
7. Llame
Antes de tomar una decisin final en un centro de cuidado, llame a para saber si el centro a tenido alguna irregularidad, y si fue as, en que consisti.
CONSIDERE SUS OPCIONES
Su primera pregunta debe ser: Qu tipo de cuidado satisface mejor las necesidades de mi hijo(a)?
Diferentes tipos de cuidado estn disponibles fuera de casa y cada una ofrece sus propios beneficios:
Centro de cuidado infantil
Cuidado y actividades educativas son ofrecidos a un grupo de nios en un establecimiento no residencial, con licencia, acomodando a mas de 18 nios.

Casas de cuidado infantil familiares
El cuidado y actividades educacionales ofrecidos a un grupo de seis nios o menos en casa de una persona que ofrece cuidado y que est inscrita. Los hogares de cuidado infantil pueden acomodar hasta 18 nios.
Head Start e Intervencin Pre-Kindergarten
Los programas usualmente quedan situados en los recintos escolares o son operados por un proveedor privado; generalmente se adhieren al horario escolar.
Cuidado infantil de edad escolar
Estos son programas para nios de edades entre 5 y 12 aos cubriendo tiempo antes y despus de la escuela; algunos ofrecen programas de das festivos y en otras ocasiones que la escuela no est en actividades. De nuevo, estos pueden ser en escuelas, Centros de Cuidado Infantil, Casas de Cuidado Infantil Familiares, Organizaciones Juveniles y Organizaciones Religiosas.
Campamentos de verano
Estos campos se ofrecen en el pblico y escenarios privados inclusive condados y municipios. Algunos programas puede ser exento de licenciar.

Si necesita ayuda en su bsqueda de cuidado infantil, contacte al Child Care Resource & Referral Agency (CCR&R) que aparece en esta publicacin, en las paginas 8 y 9. Ellos pueden ayudarlo a localizar cuidado que corresponda a sus necesidades y darle la informacin necesaria
para su bsqueda.
Puede tambin contactar al CCR&R a travs de la Georgia Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies (GACCRRA) llamando al 800-466-5681 o visitando www.gaccrra.org.

Right from the Start
Proyecto de Expansin del Medicaid
1-800-809-7276

COBERTURA DE SALUD PARA LOS QUE NO TIENEN SEGURO O TIENEN UN SEGURO LIMITADO
Visitas al Mdico Recetas para Medicinas
Vacunas Chequeos de Salud
Cuidado Dental Cuidado de la Visin
Cuidado Prenatal y ms...
Llame al 1-800-809-7276 para ms informacin y para localizar un RSM cerca de usted. Convenientes horarios de oficina para que usted pueda tener acceso fcilmente a los servicios que su familia necesita. El personal le atender amablemente con el proceso de solicitud del Medicaid y con los programas de beneficios que aparecen en este anuncio. Esos programas han sido diseados para ayudar a mejorar la salud en Georgia.

PROGRAMAS DE BENEFICIOS
Low Income Medicaid (LIM): Servicios de salud para nios elegibles, de bajos ingresos, (menores de 18 aos) y para el/los adulto/s responsables de ellos. www.dfcs.dhr.georgia.gov
Right from the Start Medicaid (RSM): Servicios de salud para nios elegibles, (hasta los 19 aos) y mujeres embarazadas. www.dfcs.dhr.georgia.gov/rsm
PeachCare for Kids (PCK): Servicios de salud para nios elegibles, (de recin nacidos a 19 aos). Los que no sean elegibles para el Medicaid segn el ingreso familiar pueden ser elegibles para PCK. La familia paga una prima por los nios entre los 6 y los 19 aos. No hay cargos para los menores de 6 aos. www.peachcare.org
Women's Health Medicaid (WHM): Cobertura de salud para mujeres menores de 65 aos, sin seguro o con un seguro limitado, que hayan sido examinadas y diagnosticadas con cncer del seno o cervical o con alguna condicin pre-cancerosa del seno o del cuello del tero. www.dch.georgia.gov
Georgia Partnership for Caring (GPCF): Una red sin fines de lucro de proveedores de servicios de salud ayuda con las medicinas recetadas y ofrece una visita gratis a un mdico primario. www.gacares.org

Para ms informacin sobre el cuidado infantil, favor de llamar a GACCRRA al 800-466-5681.

29

Se utilizan tcnicas positivas de disciplina. Los nios son tratados como individuos. Los cuidadores reconfortan a los nios cuando lo necesitan.

Lista de chequeo de cuidado infantil
Bsicos
La licencia est a la vista. Llena el requerimiento de la proporcin de personal. Las reglas escritas estn disponibles (incluyendo la poltica
de disciplina). El tamao del grupo es lo suficientemente pequeo para permitir
atencin personalizada. El horario satisface mis necesidades.
Instalaciones
El cuarto es brillante, alegre y limpio. Hay suficiente espacio para actividades. Los nios obtienen cosas por si mismos. Hay suficientes juguetes, pinturas, libros, etc. para todos
los nios. El equipo (sillas, mesas, lavabos, retretes) es del tamao de los
nios y est en buenas condiciones.
Personal
Los cuidadores han trabajado ah por un ao o mas. Los cuidadores parecen disfrutar lo que hacen.

Envolvimiento paterno
Los padres pueden hacer visitas imprevistas. Las lneas de comunicacin entre padres y el personal
estn abiertas. La participacin paterna es alentada. Los padres son notificados si ocurre un accidente.
Programa
El programa de actividades diarias es anunciado. El juego activo y pacfico es balanceado. Las actividades son apropiadas para la edad de los nios y sus
necesidades (fsicas, emocionales, sociales, del desarrollo). Se toca msica variada durante el da. Los nios tienen oportunidades de escuchar lecturas
diariamente. La poltica de descanso/siesta es razonable.
Salud y seguridad
Los contactos de emergencia estn debidamente archivados. El personal est entrenado en tcnicas de resucitacin
cardiopulmonar y primeros auxilios. El personal guarda una higiene adecuada (lavarse las manos
antes y despus de cambiar los paales de cada nio y/o de limpiarles la cara). El personal se cambia los guantes despus de cada cambio de paal. Los cojincillos para cambiar los paales son de un material no absorbente. Los infantes/nios son capaces de explorar el medioambiente de una manera segura.
Entrenamiento/Credenciales
Los empleados tienen entrenamiento especial en la educacin de la primera infancia.
Los maestros titulares tienen un grado universitario en educacin pedaggica o un credencial de Child Development Associate (CDA).
Los programas de cuidado infantil tienen acreditacin nacional. Los centros de Cuidado Infantil Familiares tienen una credencial
CDA o una acreditacin del National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC).
Impresin general
Los nios parecen estar felices aqu. Me sentira cmodo(a) dejando a mi nio aqu. Si yo fuera un nio me sentira feliz aqu. Hay un ambiente tranquilo y agradable en esta instalacin.

30

Para ms informacin sobre el cuidado de la salud, favor de llamar a Powerline al 800-822-2539.

E C C E
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